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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
. meanwhile, governor mitt romney held a relief rally in the battleground state of ohio for victims of sandy. he urged americans outside the affected areas to help out in any way they can. inthese fil days befe e electn, both candidates are ramping up efforts to mobilize voters, including their faith-based supporters. kim lawton has been leading our coverage of the campaigns. she looks at the many ways religion has played a role this time around. >> both campaigns continue their active efforts to get their constituencies out to the polls next week. professor john green of the bliss institute at the university of akron says in a tight election, the campaigns look to the coalitions they can rely upon, and that includes faith coalitions. >> each side understands that every vote will count. >> green says while faith-based outreach hasn't dominated this campaign season, it has continued to be a key factor. >> a lot of that effort, though, is not on television. it's going on behind the scenes, because appealing to a particular group always has the capacity of alienating another group. this is true
largely to strong support from latino catholics. mitt romney won the white catholic vote by an almost 20-point margin. almost 80% of evangelicals who voted voted for romney. black protestants went overwhelmingly for obama, as did the vast majority of jews. but the biggest share of obama's faith coalition was voters who say they aren't affiliated with any religion. steve schneck was co-chair of catholics for obama. he says while issues like abortion, religious liberty and gay marriage were important, in the end, it was the economy that tipped the scale for the president. >> all of these religious issues, while they are important to religious voters, i think, even among religious voters, they ranked these issues a little further down on the spectrum. >> ralph reed of the faith and freedom coalition admitted that a massive mobilization among religious conservatives wasn't enough to offset the number of women, young people and minorities who voted democratic. >> i think we need to do a better job of not looking like, you know, your daddy's religious right. you know we have to be as a movemen
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)